Home > Article > Is Britain’s first modern dry bar any fun? – Features – Food & Drink – The Independent

Is Britain’s first modern dry bar any fun? – Features – Food & Drink – The Independent

JFR alcohol

Even for those who do drink alcohol and want to have a night off the juice, most bars – and especially pubs – struggle to offer more than the usual selection of fizzy drinks and a few bottled mixers. And as for bottled fresh orange juice? “The devil’s work,” a non-drinking friend assures me. The growth of premium soft drinks, such as Fentimans‘ range, has made the situation a little better, but for those who can’t drink or don’t want to drink – an evening in the pub necking lime sodas or pints of Coke can be about as appealing as, well, a bloated stomach full of sugar and caffeine.

It’s particularly hard for those in recovery, where the temptation to crack and join in on the round of beers can have a devastating personal impact.

Which makes it all the more surprising that it’s taken so long for something like The Brink – Britain’s first modern dry bar – to open. Located on the quiet, cobbled Parr Street, the venue is off the beaten track but minutes away from the rest of Liverpool city centre‘s heavy drinking bars and nightclubs.

Recent Local Alcohol Profiles in England (Lape) figures released by the Centre for Public Health at Liverpool John Moores University ranked Liverpool as one of the worst cities for alcohol abuse in England. It came bottom of the rankings, 326 out of 326, in five of the Lape categories.

Taking just two of them, the city had more than 3,800 alcohol-related hospital admissions for both men and women this year not including visits to A&E – Leeds, a city with a similar-sized population and an equally vibrant nightlife had 2,289. Deaths from chronic liver disease and other alcohol-specific causes are also well above local and national averages.

via Is Britain’s first modern dry bar any fun? – Features – Food & Drink – The Independent.

Strange Random Alcohol Quote:

“Two great European narcotics, alcohol and Christianity” – Friedrich Nietzsche (German classical Scholar, Philosopher and Critic of culture, 1844-1900.)

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