Home > Article > Who chooses the set-texts our children study? – The Independent

Who chooses the set-texts our children study? – The Independent

To Kill a Mockingbird

Image via Wikipedia

During the next two or three weeks, around a million teenagers will settle down to answer questions on texts as diverse as To Kill a Mockingbird, King Lear, Carol Ann Duffy‘s poetry, Keats’ odes and Great Expectations. There were 711,196 entries for courses with an English component, and 528,315 for the full English-literature course at GCSE last year. The curriculum usually now requires some set-text work for English as well as for English literature. It adds up to huge numbers of texts being studied by dizzyingly large numbers.

via Who chooses the set-texts our children study? – Features, Books – The Independent.

Strange Random Literature Quote:

“Just don’t take any class where you have to read BEOWULF.” – Woody Allen

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]
Advertisements
  1. May 18, 2010 at 6:48 pm

    Google translates “mockingbird” to “sinsonte” but the classical translation to spanish is “ruiseñor”. Sinsonte and ruiseñor are two different class of birds. What is the correct translation?

    • May 19, 2010 at 5:02 pm

      Hi Magda,

      Well, according to the Collins, “sinsonte” is the proper translation of “mockingbird” and “ruiseñor” is actually a “nightingale”.

      On the Spanish page of Wikipedia about the novel, it says:

      En la novela Lee utiliza la figura del ruiseñor para simbolizar la inocencia (Mockingbird se tradujo al español como ruiseñor, nombre con que muchos conocen en América al sinsonte).

      It’s also possible that “Matar a un Sinsonte”, simply sounds confusing as a title.

      Thanks for the question!

  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: